"Good jobs vs. Happy jobs": The role of "self-concept" in shaping career choices

Date
2015-04
Authors
Achiampong, Estalynn Betty
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Abstract
As the Ghanaian graduate labor market is increasingly becoming more competitive to keep up with tertiary institutions churning out 10,000's of students annually, it has become essential for workers to not only find job roles, but to be retained in those job roles. In order to do this, one must consider the factors that influence the career choices of the graduate labor pool. This research studies "self-concept" specifically as a key factor in determining career choices made by the average graduate worker. Beyond this, the study seeks to explore a possible relationship between career personality alignment and job satisfaction. Through the use of online questionnaires, the study sampled data from 80 respondents, representing the graduate workforce of Ghana. Secondary data obtained from journals, books, scholarly and news articles were also used to guide the research methodology and data collection and analysis. The theoretical framework adopted for the purpose of this research was Holland's Theory of Career Choice and Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. From data findings obtained, income was the motivator most highly ranked by respondents, whilst career personality alignment was lowly ranked. Career personality alignment was however the main theme underlining job satisfaction levels for respondents. Age played a significant role in determining the job characteristics prioritized by the graduate workforce, with the older sample population placing emphasis on the need for career personality alignment as their main source of satisfaction, whilst younger respondents identified income as the most valuable intrinsic job characteristic.
Description
Thesis submitted to the Department of Business Administration, Ashesi University College, in partial fulfillment of Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration, April 2015
Keywords
Ghana, self-concept, self-actualization, graduate employment, careers, job satisfaction
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